Monday, November 23, 2015

A conifer collector's confection

I've been to a few "Collector's Gardens" – gardens of true plant-a-holics that collect non-run-of-the-mill plants. Mostly they've been garden writer friends or folks that work for nurseries that can more readily get their hands on unique plants, or hard-to-find cultivars of more common plants. In my experience, they're usually less "designed" and more of a hodge podge of plants (well-suited to their spots) that the owner gets excited about.

This plant collector's garden, just outside Toronto, blew me away.

The Marion Jarvie garden was more of a curio cabinet of a garden. Or it looked as if you were touring a botanical garden, condensed into a small suburban lot. The more, and closer, you looked–the more there was to see.

Mostly featuring dwarf conifers of every size, shape, and color, it also hosts wonderful trees, shrubs and even some perennials I'm sure came from other planets.

This was just one of the dozens of gardens toured as part of the 2015 Garden Bloggers Fling in Toronto this past June. More than 70 gardeners attended. It was difficult to get photos without other gardeners in them–crouching, stretching, and contorting to get their photos taken. I wouldn't want it any other way. You can learn a lot touring gardens with 70+ people smarter than you that can answer questions, make you look at things you wouldn't normally see, or even just ask great questions themselves.

Not much else I can say. You'll just have to appreciate the photos...

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Pot lights for the potting shed

I wanted some solar terracotta pot lights for the potting shed (the shed has no electricity). What potting shed should NOT have a plant pot light? Seemed simple enough. I went looking for something like this by Googling and searching on Pinterest, but came up empty.

So I went to my friendly local hardware store, bought the solar lights and pots. The hardware store folks were a great help in suggesting how best to drill terracotta, the exact "L" brackets that are bendy enough to adjust its angle, and suggested the neoprene (rubber) washers for the screws.

I think they came out pretty well. The lights are rather dim, but this was just the first night's photos. I don't think the lights got enough sun power before I put them up. Even if they are on the dim side, they still work well. Glad I painted the interior of the pot white.

At first I tried drilling the holes with wood drill bits. It worked, but it took about 45 minutes to drill two holes. I have a masonry drill bit now, and it was suggested that I add water as I drill and that may help things along. Then I just added the solar light on top with just a couple dabs of glue. Almost any glue would work. I had some glass/metal glue on hand and it works fine. UPDATE: The masonry drill bit worked wonders. Keeping the area wet, it drilled through with little effort. I drilled six holes in three pots in ten minutes.

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Gardening on Instagram

I'm new to Instagram as of about four weeks ago. I like to jump on trends years after they begin. 

It's a very visual medium. I've been blogging here for nigh on nine years. The blog is writing and photos. Facebook is short blurbs and images and links. Pinterest is my visual "file folder" of things I find I like and can easily refer back to. Instagram's strength, in my opinion, is it makes a viewer focus on one image at a time. It's got plenty of garden porn for my visual pleasure. 

Through Instagram I am able to share the thousands upon thousands of garden photos I've taken over the years – from garden blogger meet-ups, trips abroad, garden tours locally and around the country, visits to botanical gardens, hikes, and my own garden and neighborhood. Some photos have been published on this blog, most have not. It's nice to have a venue for them – as opposed to sitting on a hard drive on my desk.

I'm still getting the hang of how it all works. Hashtags are new to me. Do people really use them? The interface on my desktop computer is lackluster and basic (and frustrating). The iPhone images seem so small at times, especially for complex photos. The iPad is just right.

If you're on Instagram, look me up, you can find me at jimcharlier.

Sunday, November 1, 2015

I am Grout, the potting shed update


Almost ready for winter. I'm grouting the diamond-shaped slate tiles along the foundation this weekend. Then I just have to frame in a couple small windows.

Then, it's "winterized." Or, at least, the exterior is 90% finished. As long as these nice weekends hold, I may be able to get some work done inside – principally a potting bench and pegboard walls. Over the winter will be decorative elements – window boxes, lattice, an arbor, and a shelf under the window you see above, all built in the basement – the house basement. No, the potting shed doesn't have a basement.

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