Thursday, December 31, 2015

In the garden, in December

Not much going on in December, in the garden, in Buffalo, chez Charlier. The only news here is that we've had the least snow so far this winter in recorded history. We've also broken the top recorded temperatures for almost every day this month.

In the photo above you get to see the bones of the diamond-shaped dwarf pear tree espalier. I have to do something about trimming the tops this spring. They get pretty massive and thick up there.

Since there's not much to say about gardening, I can show what's been happening around the yard and garden.

The grill/bar area is so forlorn looking with out green on the grate and drinks on the bar.
The front yard is barren from a distance. Miss the window box plantings this time of year. I usually put pine boughs in the window boxes for some color, but never got to that this year.
Cripes. The lightning-shaped lightning rod has been up there a few years and could use another coat of "fixative" to keep the rusting at bay. Now who's going to go up there and do THAT!?
Closer still and you can't see what life there is – this late in December.
...but there is life. It's been so unseasonable warm and no snow cover so the daffodils are peeking up. No worries though, they'll still get their deep freeze and snow insulation and will probably be fine.
This part of the yard - the hot tub - sees the most action in winter. We use it about 4-5 times a week.

The checkerboard garden of grass has seen better days – but never better days in December!
This is where the Harry Potter Garden will be replanted, after last summer's shed construction. I've moved a few plants back already and have mulched them to protect them a bit. One square will be solid black Mondo grass. My phlomis died, so I'll have to find another. It's such an odd flower that no Harry Potter garden should be without one or more. Many of my tropical houseplants summer here.
There's still a couple pots out - one with bamboo (which cannot be killed!), and some strawberries, which should be fine (with insulating snow). You can see here the "bones" of the dwarf apple tree espalier that acts as a low "fence" around the raised bed potager garden.
Haven't been able to do too much in the shed - but I did add mullions to the side windows in the bay window one day when the temperature hit above 50º.
The sunroof, though extra trouble and expense, was totally worth it for all the light it provides.
I'm actually using it to store plants and pots this winter. Next year – tools and work space.
Cute, no? I've built window boxes for these windows already, just waiting till spring to put them on.
My first roofing job ever - and it doesn't leak! (So far).
The planted hellstrip needs more grass to go before it's all gone. Added a yucca this year. We'll have to see how that does over the winter. We really need that snow cover.
Nice and bright inside. The potting bench will go beneath that window.
Not sure if it will help, but I put this landscape fabric over the hanging succulent garden frame to keep the harsh winds OFF the overwintering hens & chicks and sedum. They really prefer snow cover but don't get it now, being vertical and all.
If there's any color to ba had out there, it's still here in the coral bell (heuchera) bed. These things will be the first color in the spring, too.
Not sure if this helps either, but the marble and granite "carpet" is covered for the winter. In the spring it'll take a bit of sand to sweep into the grooves to look as good as new.

4 comments:

  1. Fascinating - even in winter. I enjoy seeing the many unique features of your yard, garden and potting shed.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Rebbecca, very kind of you to say. And I love your blog post "Bed Rest". Great title!

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  2. Your shed is beyond stunning! Beautiful and useful and with clever ligjts.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Ms. Wis.! Nie to see you face pop up on here! Hope all is well by you!

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